2 Chronicles 6:2-42, Habakkuk 1

Today, read 2 Chronicles 6:2-42 and Habakkuk 1.

This devotional is about Habakkuk 1.

Habakkuk, a prophet to the Southern Kingdom of Judah, was very upset with the Lord in the first four verses of this chapter. He saw so much sin and violence (v. 3) among the Lord's people but, when he called for God's justice, he got nothing (v. 1).

God may have declined to respond to Habakkuk's earlier complaints but he was more than happy to answer Habbakuk's questions in verses 2-4 with an answer in verses 5-11. And what was that answer? God would punish the violence and sinfulness of the Jews by delivering his peopel in defeat to the Babylonians (v. 6).

Now Habakkuk had a much bigger theological problem. He couldn't understand why God wouldn't judge his countrymen but, when God did promise to punish them, Habakkuk couldn't understand why he'd use a wicked nation like the Babylonians (v. 15). God is holy and eternal (v. 12a-b), so why would he use such unholy people? It made no sense.

We'll have to wait until tomorrow's reading of chapter 2 for God's response but, in the meantime, consider the problem of the sliding scale of righteousenss. Habakkuk knew God's people were doing evil (vv. 2-4) but the Babylonians were worse! Verse 13 asked the Lord, "Why are you silent while the wicked swallow up those more righteous than themselves?"

We can probably identify with Habakkuk's complaint. If you've ever felt outrage when a good person died young while evil men live into their 90s, you know how Habakkuk felt. If you ever cried, "Unfair!" when you were punished for something when someone else was doing something worse, you're using the same kind of reasoning that Habakkuk used.

The truth is that we are all guilty before a holy God. What Habakkuk said in verse 13a was right on the money: "Your eyes are too pure to look on evil; you cannot tolerate wrongdoing" so his next statement could have been, "...so we deserve your punishment, no matter how it comes." But part of our sinful state is to demand that we be tested on a curve. "I am sinful, but not as bad as others" we reason, "so let God go after the worst offenders first! And, when he comes for me, I should get a much lighter sentence!"

But God's justice is always just; that is, he pays out the wages of sin according to the pricetag that every sin has---death--regardless of how many or how few sins we accumulate. Instead of complaining to God about our circumstances and wondering why he hasn't treated others worse than he treated us, we should take a very hard look at ourselves. We are guilty before a holy God. One violation of his law carries the death penalty so none of us has anything to complain about.

In fact, Judah had God's law, their own history, and prophets like Habakkuk. The Babylonians were wicked but they were also going on much less truth than Judah had. As Jessu told us, the more truth you have, the greater your accountabilty will be before God.

In God's great mercy, he poured out his justice on Jesus so that you and I could be saved from the eternal condemnation we deserve. God may allow the natural consequences of our sin to play out on this earth but at least we will be delivered from hell based on the righteousness of Christ. So we should be thankful for that.

But more than that, the awful cost of our sins that Jesus bore should teach us the truth about divine justice and adjust our expectations accordingly. So, have you found yourself complaining that you're paying too much for your sins why others are not paying enough? Then think about this passage and let it realign your understanding of justice accordingly.

We have nothing to complain about and everything--because of God's mercy--to be thankful about. Let's thank God, then, for his perfect justice and for the mercy that Jesus provided us with by taking God's justice for us on the cross.