judah

2 Chronicles 13, Haggai 1

Today’s OT18 readings are 2 Chronicles 13 and Haggai 1.

This devotional is about 2 Chronicles 13.

The Northern and Southern Kingdoms battled each other from the very beginning as we saw yesterday in 2 Chronicles 12:15e. The battling continued after Rehoboam’s son Abijah took over as king of Judah (13:1-2). Abijah was not content to wage war against his Northern brothers in Israel; he first preached to them about how they had forsaken the Lord (vv. 4-12). While he was preaching, however, Jeroboam decided to send troops behind him to attack from two sides (vv. 13-14). This gave Abijah the opportunity to practice what he was preaching. He had already claimed, “God is with us; he is our leader” (v. 12). Now he would have the chance to put that claim into action.

To his credit Abijah and his men “cried out to the Lord” (v. 14b). The Lord kept his promise and “God delivered them into their hands” (v. 17b). Make no mistake about it; Judah was outnumbered with only 400,000 troops against Israel’s 800,000 (v. 3) but because they trusted in God for victory, verse 18 says “...the people of Judah were victorious because they relied on the Lord, the God of their ancestors.”

Speaking truth to others is important but applying the truth to our own situation is every bit as important. If Abijah had preached to Israel about Judah’s faith in God but then surrendered when Israel surrounded him or, worse, cried out to another god, his message would have lost all credibility.

When you tell others around you what God’s word says and what God wants you to do, do you apply that to yourself as well? Every challenge we face in life is an opportunity either to apply God’s word to our lives or to have our own hypocrisy revealed. Be a person who both speaks truth to others AND follows the truth in your own life.

Genesis 49, Job 15, Psalm 47

Today’s readings are Genesis 49, Job 15, Psalm 47.

This devotional is about Genesis 49.

The leadership power in Jacob’s family was about to pass from Jacob himself to his descendants in this chapter. Isaac had one son, Jacob, accepted as the covenant heir and the other son, Esau, rejected for that role but all of Jacob’s sons would receive the covenant blessing. Each would become the leader of one of Israel’s tribes. In this chapter, Isaac conferred that blessing of tribal leadership on them and made prophecies about each one.

Although it was customary for the eldest son to to receive the greatest blessing, God had bypassed that custom with Jacob. That was based on God’s free choice alone. Reuben, Jacob’s firstborn, forfeited his covenant blessing as the firstborn by having sex with one of Jacob’s wives (v. 4, cf. Gen 35:22). This was not the last time a man’s immorality caused him to lose political power.

The next two guys in line, Simeon and Levi, disqualified themselves with cruel vengeance far beyond what was justly warranted (vv. 5-7; cf. Gen 34:25). Although Reuben, Simeon, and Levi got to be tribal heads in Israel, they did not get to have a descendent become the king of Israel.

That honor fell to Judah. He had his moral problems, too (see Gen 38), but he was chosen to be the leader of the tribe that would bring Israel her king (v. 10). And, what a king he would be! Verse 10 says that, “he obedience of the nations shall be his.” This, of course, is a reference to Christ. Jesus came to be the Messiah, the king of Israel, but he has not fully assumed that role yet. When he reigns on earth in his Millennial kingdom, this prophecy will finally be fulfilled.

Verses 11-12 describe a time of massive prosperity. Vines and branches (v. 11) are fruit bearing objects; they have value. You wouldn’t tether a donkey or a colt to them because you don’t want those animals eating such valuable fruits. Unless, of course, there is so much fruit available that even the animals can enjoy it without it costing too much financially. Likewise, wine is valuable; you wouldn’t wash clothes with it unless it was so abundant that you didn’t fear “wasting” it. This is what life in the kingdom will be like when Jesus reigns. There will be no poverty, no lack. The world will be at peace under its true, perfect king and there will be prosperity like mankind has never enjoyed.

Isn’t it amazing to read such a detailed prophecy of Christ so many thousands of years ago? This prophecy has not been fulfilled, yet, but God has identified Jesus who will fulfill it and he has repeated the prophecy and given us even more information about life in his kingdom. Passages like this are one of many reasons why we know that the Bible is not just any book; it is God’s word. In it, God has told us what the future holds. The places where his prophesies have been fulfilled already give us greater confidence in one like this which we are still waiting to come to pass.

Trust the Bible; it is God’s word and he has proven it true over and over again.