songs

Genesis 23, Nehemiah 12, Psalm 22

Today, read Genesis 23, Nehemiah 12, Psalm 22.

This devotional is about Nehemiah 12, particularly verses 27-47.

God was doing something in Jerusalem. Compared to the growth and expansion of the kingdom that David and Solomon saw, what Nehemiah and his countrymen were doing was small. But, compared to the ruin that Jerusalem had been for 70 years and the powerlessness and exile that God’s people had experienced for a generation, the days of Nehemiah and Ezra were amazing. They were more hopeful than successful, like a sprout from the ground on a farm that hadn’t produced anything in years. A sprout is not the same as an acre of corn ready to be harvested, but it is a reason to be hopeful. Every acre of corn began with a spout, after all.

So, these were not Judah’s greatest days politically or economically. But spiritually, they were powerful. God was moving in his people and for his people again. He was working in the hearts of pagan kings and governors to protect and provide for his people. The people were expressing repentance for their disobedience to his word and were publicly recommitting themselves to obey his covenant. And what was result of all of this work God was doing in Jerusalem? Singing!

The wall around Jerusalem was a defense mechanism. It had no real spiritual purpose, like the altar and the temple did. It was there to protect the inhabitants of the city from enemy attacks. Nehemiah saw the repair and rebuilding of this wall as a spiritual act, however, because Jerusalem was God’s city. It was the place where his temple was, where his name would dwell, and eventually where his Messiah would reign. So, when the wall was finished, Nehemiah organized a ceremony to dedicate it (v. 27). And, one of the key features of that dedication ceremony was singing. “Two large choirs” (v. 31) were organized “that gave thanks” (vv. 31, by singing during this ceremony (v. 40). They were joined by “musical instruments prescribed by David the man of God” (v. 36). The two choirs stood on top of the wall to give thanks, then they came together to continue that singing in the temple (v. 40). The result of all of this music was joy. Look at how verse 43 described it: “And on that day they offered great sacrifices, rejoicing because God had given them great joy. The women and children also rejoiced. The sound of rejoicing in Jerusalem could be heard far away.”

The music offered to God on that day had such a powerful affect that people wanted it to continue. People brought provisions to the temple (v. 44) to provide for musicians and singers (vv. 46-47). This shows what a key, important role music has in the worship of God’s people. When God is working in people’s lives, they want to praise him in song. Music lifts our hearts when they are wounded and it gives us a way to express our joy when we are glad and thankful for what God has done. This can be part of your walk with God as well. Not only can we be thankful for Nick Slayton and all the worship team members who lead us in worship each Sunday, we in this age have the gift of recorded music to help us worship in our private devotional times, to encourage us when we are down, and to help set our hearts to thankfulness and praise as we go to work each day. Given that it is Monday and you may not like what you will face this week, why not pick an uplifting song of praise to listen to on your way to work? Sing along and let the Lord use this gift to help you start the week off in dedication and praise to him.

Deuteronomy 32, Psalm 119:121–144, Isaiah 59, Matthew 7

If you’re following the schedule, you should read these chapters today: Deuteronomy 32, Psalm 119:121–144, Isaiah 59, Matthew 7. Click on any of those references to see all the passages in one long page on BibleGateway. If you can't do all the readings today, read Deuteronomy 32.

There is an unfortunate chapter division here in Deuteronomy. In yesterday’s passage Deuteronomy 31:19 says, “Now write down this song and teach it to the Israelites and have them sing it, so that it may be a witness for me against them.” But the song introduced in that passage actually begins here in Deuteronomy 32 and it reminds us of how effective music is in communicating. Many of us learned the alphabet when we were kids by learning a song. Some of us learned the books of the Bible by learning a song where they were all listed. Paragraphs of prose are great at explaining the details about a thing, but a song can make the most important aspects of something memorable. This is a good reminder to us to think consciously about the songs we teach our children; the ideas they learn to sing may have a greater impact on their future decisions than all the Sunday School lessons they ever hear—combined. It is a good reminder for us, too, to be thoughtful and wise about the sources of entertainment we choose. What’s one song you learned that you wish you could forget because the ideas are hostile to your faith? On the other hand, what song did you learn that helped you make godly or wise decisions in your life? 

Now for your thoughts: What stood out in your Bible reading for today? What questions do you have about what you read? What are your thoughts about what I wrote above? Post them in the comments below or on our Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/calvarybiblechurch/. And, feel free to answer and interact with the questions and comments of others. Have a great day; we'll talk scripture again tomorrow.